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Department of Mathematical Sciences

Siegel, Michael S.

Contact Info
Title: Professor and Director of CAMS
Email: michael.s.siegel@njit.edu
Office: 612 Cullimore
Phone: 973-596-5835
Dept: Mathematical Sciences
Webpage: http://m.njit.edu/~misieg/

About Me

The research of Michael Siegel is focused on the analysis and numerical computation of moving boundary problems in fluid mechanics, materials science, and biology. His research interests include singularity formation on interfaces, the dynamics of drops and bubbles, and the development of numerical methods for interfacial flow with soluble surfactant. He is also developing efficient, nonstiff boundary integral methods for 3D interfacial flow with surface tension.

Education

  • PhD, Mathematics, New York University
  • MS, Mathematics, New York University
  • BS, Physics and Mathematics, Duke University

Honors and Awards

  • NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship, 1992-95. 
  • NSF Grant, Surfactant Effects on Viscous Fingering,  1997-2001. 
  • NSF Grant, Analysis and Numerical Computations of  Moving Boundaries in Materials Science and Fluid Dynamics, 2001-2005.
  • NSF Grant, Focused Research Group: Singularity Formation for the Three-Dimensional Euler Equations and Related Problems (with R. Caflisch, T. Hou and D. Pullin), 2004-2007.
  • NSF Grant, Major Research Instrumentation: Acquisition of a Computer Cluster  for the Center of Applied Mathematics and Statistics at NJIT (with D. Ahluwalia and M. Ma), 2004-2007.
  • NSF Grant, Equipment and Modules for a Capstone Course in Applied Mathematics (with M. Booty, B. Bukiet, L. Kondic, D. Goldman)

Courses I Teach

ADVANCED SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING
DOCT DISSERTATION & RES

Classes Taught

Spring 2008 Course


Research Interests

  • Moving boundary problems in fluid mechanics, materials science, and physiology
  • scientific computation

The research of Michael Siegel is focused on the analysis and numerical computation of moving boundary problems that arise in fluid mechanics, materials science, and physiology.  His research in fluid dynamics covers singularity formation on interfaces for inviscid and low Reynolds number (Stokes) flow, the dynamics of drops and bubbles (including the influence of surfactant), and effect of small regularization--such as surface tension--on mathematically ill-posed interfacial flow  problems.  His studies in materials science primarily involve crystal growth and diffusion controlled moving boundary problems.  In physiology, he has studied optimal suturing patterns for skin wounds and formulated models for determining the stress and strain distribution in the heart wall that occur due to changes in heart geometry.


Selected Publications

 

More publications can be found in my cv: