You are in the College of Science and Liberal ArtsCollege of Science and Liberal Arts

Department of Mathematical Sciences

Goodman, Roy H.

Contact Info
Title: Associate Professor
Email: roy.goodman@njit.edu
Office: CULM 624
Phone: 973-642-4261
Dept: Mathematical Sciences
Webpage:

About Me

Roy Goodman´s research focuses, broadly, on nonlinear wave phenomena. The tools he uses consist mainly of asymptotic methods, dynamical systems analysis, and numerical simulation. Physical applications he has studied include storm propagation in the atmosphere at middle latitudes and the interaction of light pulses in telecommunications optical fibers. Recently, he has been investigating the interaction of nonlinear waves with localized changes to the media through which they propagate. This includes the enticing possibility of "light trapping" at specified locations in optical fibers, as well as more abstract studies of classical nonlinear wave equations. His research has explained, in great detail, a long-observed phenomenon of chaotic scattering in solitary wave collisions.

Education

  • PhD, Mathematical Sciences, Courant Institute, New York University
  • BS, Mathematics, University of Michigan

Courses I Teach

INTRO PARTIAL DIFF EQ
LINEAR ALGEBRA
DOCTORAL DISSERTATION

Research Interests

  • Nonlinear waves
  • Optics
  • Dynamical systems
  • The intersection of the three in solitary wave interaction problems

Roy Goodman´s research focuses, broadly, on nonlinear wave phenomena.  The tools he uses consist mainly of asymptotic methods, dynamical systems analysis, and numerical simulation. Physical applications he has studied include storm propagation in the atmosphere at middle latitudes and the interaction of light pulses in telecommunications optical fibers. 

  • Research supported by the NSF under grants DMS-0204881, DMS-0506495, and DMS-0807284. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

Current Research

Recently, he has been investigating the interaction of nonlinear waves with localized changes to the media through which they propagate.  This includes the enticing possibility of "light trapping" at specified locations in optical fibers, as well as more abstract studies of classical nonlinear wave equations.


Publications

  • Publications (reprints, preprints, links to journals, some commentary)